The Reverend Dr. D.M. Brown

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Background
...to these pages

Introduction

Chapter 1
The Early Years

Chapter 2
1910-1921

Chapter 3
Itete (1921-26)

Chapter 4
Lubwa (1927-31)

>>Chapter 5
Lubwa (1932-39)

Chapter 6
Lubwa (1939-47)

Chapter 7
Conclusion

Appendix
Further material

Chapter 5 Lubwa (1932-1939)


Typical diary page during home furlough - 13 Feb 1932

This term of service is mainly covered by photographs. This time three children were left at home, only the youngest son (John, born in 1929) was with his parents. All those at home received a weekly letter, alternately from Mother or Father. White children were always greatly loved and admired by the Africans, whose affectionate name for Dr. Brown was Bashimele (Mary’s father) and for Mrs. Brown Banajohn (John’s mother).

Furlough in 1936 must have seemed a short reunion of all the members of the family. How could they know, as they said goodbye in 1937 that it would be ten years until parents would see children again, except for Nessie (aged 19 in 1937) who trained as a nurse and went out to the Copper Belt, visiting Lubwa on the way North. In ten years time David (15) had spent years as a RAF pilot and had completed his MA degree at Edinburgh. Mary (12) had got married and had a son; and their little John, aged 8, whom they had never left before and who so greatly admired his Dad and wished to be a doctor like him – what did ten years do to him? He now wanted to be an engineer and was learning the hard way, wearing greasy overalls in an engineering shop.

Doctor Brown, Nurse Service and hospital assistants

It was a tremendous price that missionaries paid in those days, giving up years of family life. We should be glad that modern communications mean that this need no longer happen nowadays. During the war years all home furlough was cancelled but two spells of holiday were taken in South Africa. Meanwhile the work was expanding and Lubwa’s complement of buildings was complete – church, hospital school, dormitories, and houses. Now more village work was possible once more.



Livingstonia Mission, Lubwa building works Livingstonia Mission, Lubwa building works caption
Livingstonia Mission, Lubwa Lubwa Mission caption
News cutting about a Motherwell man - the "Rainmaker" News cutting about opening of Lubwa hospital
Lubwa Church. (With foundations of new hospital in the foreground.) Everything - bricks, tiles, couples, boards, windows, doors, etc. - made on the spot by native boys, under the supervision of Rev Dr Brown. Only glass, nails, locks etc. are imported Lubwa Church
News cutting about Lubwa hospital in the Scottish Nurse Magazine - part 1 News cutting about Lubwa hospital in the Scottish Nurse Magazine - part 2

Annandale Hospital: An extension was added after Dr Brown's death and called the Dr Brown Memorial

Lubwa Church. (With foundations of new hospital in the foreground.) In course of erection. Rev Dr Brown is seen putting in key bricks of arch. His native assistants are also seen at work, Everything - bricks, tiles, couples, boards, windows, doors, etc. - made on the spot by native boys, under the supervision of Rev Dr Brown. Only glass, nails, locks etc. are imported Lubwa Church

...or click here for close-up of the people only


On Ulendo.

Ulendo is derived from the local Chichewa & Naya word for "a journey" or "to travel"

Two ways of crossing a river:

Crossing a river - first style Crossing a river - second style

Rest and refreshment on ulendo:

Rest and refreshment on ulendo


Two patients from the isolation wards - leprous but happy. There is very little leprosy in Lubwa district:

Two patients from the isolation wards - leprous but happy. There is very little leprosy in Lubwa district

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